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Tillinghast Pond / Wickaboxet / Pratt Conservation Area

West Greenwich, Co-Owners/Managers: West Greenwich Land Trust, The Nature Conservancy, and RI DEM

10.0 miles of trail

Moderate

Close

Very Easy

Trails that are smooth and relatively level with no steps, no roots, stones or uneven ground. These may be paved, crushed stone, continuous boardwalk and similar surfaces. These trails have a route that is quite obvious such as a single point to point trail or an easy loop or network of trails.

Easy

Relatively flat and smooth trails with a route that is quite obvious such as a single point to point trail or an easy loop or network of trails.

Moderate

May have a few hills or steep sections and multiple surface types including rocks and roots. Trails are generally well-marked but following them requires a trail map.

Difficult

Strenuous trails, trail systems that mostly involve multi-mile loops and trails that are narrow and may have obstacles such as stream crossings or rocky areas, some trails are less well marked.

Hunting is permitted here in season. Wear blaze orange during hunting season. More information

Click on the "Trail Map (PDF)" button to download a PDF of the trail map that you can print and take with you on the trail.

Avenza maps are special, free maps that you can use in the Avenza app on your smart phone. These maps let you see your location on the map as you walk. Download the Avenza App for free in the Apple App Store or on Google Play

Click on the Avenza Trail Map button to "purchase" the free map for this trail from the Avenza map store. If this is your first time, Avenza will ask you to set up an account to check out. However, all Avenza trail maps listed on ExploreRI are free.

In Rhode Island the primary hunting seasons typically run from the second Saturday in September to the last day of February and from the third Saturday in April to the last day in May, however this can vary from year to year and depends on what game is being hunted. During hunting season you should wear at least 200 square inches (a hat OR a vest) of blaze orange. During shotgun deer season, which is typically in December, you should wear at least 500 square inches of blaze orange (a hat AND a vest). For more information see the RI DEM website.

Trailhead Kiosk at the Plain Road TrailheadTillinghast PondTillinghast PondFall Field on the Coney Brook TrailBoardwalk Across a Wet Area on the Pond TrailViewing Platform at the North End of Tillinghast Pond

What’s There:

These three adjacent preserves protect over 2700 acres of forest, fields, streams and ponds in western West Greenwich. Tillinghast Pond Management Area is the western-most of the preserves and centers around the 40-acre Tillinghast Pond. There are about 6 1/2 miles of trails in Tillinghast, in three loops (described below). Pratt Conservation Area is the smallest and eastern-most of the preserves, and currently has a single, approximately half-mile long trail down to the beautiful but unfortunately named Acid Factory Brook. Wickaboxet Management Area is between Tillinghast and Pratt. A trail spanning the Wickaboxet, Tillinghast and Pratt conservation areas opened in the spring of 2013, creating a 10 mile network of interconnected trails.

Surrounded by protected forest, Tillinghast Pond Management Area offers serenity and natural beauty that rank among the best in southern New England. Tillinghast Pond's waters are clear and shallow, perfect for a family paddle. Cast a line, explore the coves, or just float around and let the solitude recharge your batteries.

The Nature Conservancy, RIDEM, and the Town of West Greenwich are working closely together to establish Tillinghast Pond as a top hiking destination. Various interconnected loop trails provide for a wide range of options, from a short walk in the woods to a half-day six-mile hike. Following are more details on just some of the possible loops. For more possible loops see the first page of the map.

The 2.3-mile Pond Loop (blazed white) starts from either end of the Plain Road parking lot. The trail passes over easy, flat terrain around Tillinghast Pond, with ample opportunities to look for wildlife or simply enjoy the long views across the water. An observation platform is located roughly half way around the pond. The Pond Loop also includes three hayfields, which are leased to a local dairy farmer.

The Flintlock Loop (blazed yellow) winds for 2.6 miles through the open woods east of Tillinghast Pond, and is highlighted by a glacial "boulder garden," a historic cemetery, and an 1830's-era farmstead. Start on the Pond Loop by the kiosk; walk for a tenth of a mile and look for the sign for the Flintlock Trail. The trail is also accessible from the small parking lot on Plain Meeting House Road, via Narrow Lane.

The Coney Brook Loop (blazed orange) takes hikers through a forest restoration site, past the stone walls of an early 1800's farm, and along the tops of glacial ridges, shaded by hemlocks and beeches. Coney Brook highlights the 2.3-mile route, rushing over a dam and through a small ravine. Start on the Pond Loop (white blazes) from the north side of the Plain Road parking lot and watch for the sign to Coney Brook approximately 500 feet ahead.

Please note: The red barn on Plain Road, and the house and garages across the street, are private property. There is no public access on the farm roads that pass next to those buildings.

Pratt Conservation Area has a single trail leading from the trailhead on Saddle Rock Road downhill through a deciduous forest to a wetland area along Acid Factory Brook. The land is steep in places and there are many rock outcrops. Along with Wickaboxet and Tillinghast, hunting is allowed in the Pratt Conservation Area. Walkers should wear blaze orange during hunting season throughout the area.

Wickaboxet Management Area contains a mix of deciduous and coniferous forests, as well as wetlands and streams. A trailhead off Plain Meeting House Road currently provides access to woods roads (no motor vehicles or bicycles allowed) that run through the preserve. The new trails are also accessible from this trailhead.

Page 3 of the trail map (below) shows the new trails in the Wickaboxet and Pratt preserves.

Portions of the text above are courtesy of The Nature Conservancy.

The Nature Conservancy web page for Tillinghast Pond Management Area

The West Greenwich Land Trust page for Pratt Conservation Area

Dogs: Yes. Dogs must be leashed and owners must pick up waste.

Other Amenities: In addition to walking trails Tillinghast Pond is also a good place to fish, kayak and canoe.

Getting There:

Plain Road-Tillinghast Pond Trailhead

Google Maps is the mapping system used on the new ExploreRI maps and shows the trailhead located on a terrain view, a street map or an aerial photograph. Clicking on this link will take you to the full Google Maps website, which is not part of ExploreRI.org.
Acme Maps shows the trailhead located on a topographic map. The Acme Maps website is not part of ExploreRI.org.

Driving Landmarks: From I-95 north or south take exit 5B for route 102/Victory Highway. This will put you on route 102/Victory Highway heading north. Go about 3 1/2 miles north on route 102 and then turn left onto Plain Meeting House Road. Go 3.9 miles west on Plain Meeting House Road and turn right onto Plain Road. The parking area for this trailhead is 0.6 miles up Plain Road, on the right.

Parking: Yes: Parking lot, 24 spaces, no overnight parking

ADA Accessible Parking Spaces? No

Coordinates: 41° 38.708' N    71° 45.4' W   See this location in: Google Maps   Acme Maps


Plain Meeting House Road Satellite Tillinghast Trailhead at Bates Homestead

Google Maps is the mapping system used on the new ExploreRI maps and shows the trailhead located on a terrain view, a street map or an aerial photograph. Clicking on this link will take you to the full Google Maps website, which is not part of ExploreRI.org.
Acme Maps shows the trailhead located on a topographic map. The Acme Maps website is not part of ExploreRI.org.

Driving Landmarks: From I-95 north or south take exit 5B for route 102/Victory Highway. This will put you on route 102/Victory Highway heading north. Go about 3 1/2 miles north on route 102 and then turn left onto Plain Meeting House Road. Go 3.7 miles west on Plain Meeting House Road and look for a small parking area on the right.

Parking: Yes: Parking lot, 4 spaces, no overnight parking

ADA Accessible Parking Spaces? No

Coordinates: 41° 38.363' N    71° 44.709' W   See this location in: Google Maps   Acme Maps


Wickaboxet Management Area Trailhead

Google Maps is the mapping system used on the new ExploreRI maps and shows the trailhead located on a terrain view, a street map or an aerial photograph. Clicking on this link will take you to the full Google Maps website, which is not part of ExploreRI.org.
Acme Maps shows the trailhead located on a topographic map. The Acme Maps website is not part of ExploreRI.org.

Driving Landmarks: From I-95 north or south take exit 5B for route 102/Victory Highway. This will put you on route 102/Victory Highway heading north. Go about 3 1/2 miles north on route 102 and then turn left onto Plain Meeting House Road. Go 3 miles west on Plain Meeting House Road and look for a small parking area on the right.

Parking: Yes: Parking lot, 6 spaces, no overnight parking

ADA Accessible Parking Spaces? No

Coordinates: 41° 38.192' N    71° 44.15' W   See this location in: Google Maps   Acme Maps


Pratt Conservation Area Trailhead

Google Maps is the mapping system used on the new ExploreRI maps and shows the trailhead located on a terrain view, a street map or an aerial photograph. Clicking on this link will take you to the full Google Maps website, which is not part of ExploreRI.org.
Acme Maps shows the trailhead located on a topographic map. The Acme Maps website is not part of ExploreRI.org.

Driving Landmarks: From I-95 north or south take exit 5B for route 102/Victory Highway. This will put you on route 102/Victory Highway heading north. Go about 3 1/2 miles north on route 102 and then turn left onto Plain Meeting House Road. Go 1.4 miles west on Plain Meeting House Road and turn right onto Saddle Rock Road. Park in the cul-de-sac at the end of Saddle Rock Road. Please respect the private property in the area and please park in a way that respects the local residents.

Parking: Yes: On street, 4 spaces, no overnight parking

ADA Accessible Parking Spaces? No

Coordinates: 41° 38.632' N    71° 42.979' W   See this location in: Google Maps   Acme Maps


Hazard Road Trailhead

Google Maps is the mapping system used on the new ExploreRI maps and shows the trailhead located on a terrain view, a street map or an aerial photograph. Clicking on this link will take you to the full Google Maps website, which is not part of ExploreRI.org.
Acme Maps shows the trailhead located on a topographic map. The Acme Maps website is not part of ExploreRI.org.

Driving Landmarks: From Ten Rod Road (Route 165) head north on Escoheag Hill Road (note that if you were to head south here you'd be on Woody Hill Road so when looking for this turn off Route 165 you can look for signs for either Escoheag Hill Road or Woody Hill Road, just make sure you head north rathre than south (i.e., if you are coming from Connecticut turn left and if you are coming from most places in Rhode Island turn right). Go about 6 miles and look for the trailhead on the right. The name of the road changes to Molasses Hill Road and Hazard Road before you get to the trailhead.

You can also access this trailhead from the north.

Parking: Yes: Parking lot

Coordinates: 41° 38.915' N    71° 46.76' W   See this location in: Google Maps   Acme Maps


 

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This site report was last updated on September 12, 2018

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